Category: Web

Cookie Control

The issue of Cookies on websites held within the EU will rise in importance in the first half of 2012. Most websites do not have a plan for the deadline of 26 May 2012 and that includes the ICO.

They are yet to advise organisations throughout the UK on how to combat this major issue that has been set in motion without much foresight into the implications.

Yes, companies do track usage of users but most of it is anonymous data. When companies do hold information about users, it tends to improve the user experience by offering personalised content.

Google+ and referential integrity

So I have a personal Google account with a personal GMail address. I run most things via this account like contacting friends, using it as correspondence for banks etc…

When Google+ was announced, I signed up straight away and I was one of the few that understood when Google started deleting those fake accounts. I was one of the few that was frustrated that I was receiving follow suggestions for people in my address book, just because I had multiple email addresses for them but there are the principles of referential integrity.

One person, one record on the database.

Now even Adobe is killing Flash

The biggest story of last year was the Apple vs Adobe clash concerning Apple’s refusal to support Flash in iOS and therefore the iPad. Adobe responded with a satirical advertising campaign called We [heart] Apple but since then the arguments have died down.

As we all move towards mobile devices including tablets, the need for Flash is beginning to wane. Why should we create flash websites if we must also create an html version? In addition, why should we create flash elements for websites if we need to create a static substitute? The introduction of HTML5 and CSS3 with the inclusion of jQuery has also contributed to the demise of Flash.

Arne Bech produced some Flash vs HTML5 advert examples to see if the user could tell the difference between them. View the advert examples here and see if you can tell the difference.

Google Web Fonts updated

The updated version of Google Web Fonts was updated this week in what should go down as one of the defining projects of web design for many years.

The whole project has been rolling along for a while and has slowly been gathering pace but the announcement at Google I/O 2011 of the new online directory was one of the standout talks. David Wurtz (@davidwurtz), Raph Levien (@raphlinus) and Darren Glenister (@typedna) presented an amazing web based repository which makes ‘Font Book’ look like yesterday’s news.

They haven’t just improved on the old font directory. They’ve given designers and developers the ultimate tool in selecting the best font for your project.

Foursquare superusers

I received my Foursquare superuser status this week and it opened all new realms within the game of the Foursquare world.

No longer am I just leaving tips, opening specials and gaining mayorships; now I’m actually helping the network to grow. And there’s more! There are different levels of being a superuser! So after investing the past 18 months on check-ins; I’ve unlocked a whole new world with access that other mere ‘users’ cannot access.

On the face of things, I’m massively talking it up.

It is, after all, just data entry. But, if you ever have a spare 5-10mins, you can feel like you are doing some good. Then, the next time you are checking in, you can see the changes instantly.

Obviously there are rules, there’s a style guide, which, although limited, could have acted as a barrier if it was any more extensive.

Is praise for the Mac App Store misguided?

The Mac App Store launched this week and after a few hiccups in authorising accounts, has been a huge hit. There has been a lot of buzz about it since, but some of this seems to be misguided.

Yes, it makes sense that software should be available to download via an online marketplace like this but it isn’t exactly taking giant leaps forward. All the Mac App Store is really doing is freeing up space within Apple’s high street stores by ultimately reducing the offer of boxes of software that serve no purpose.

Opera 11 released

Opera 11 beta was released this week, this may not seem like much to some because their market share has been crippled in recent months by the growth of Chrome and the resurgence of IE with IE9.

But to those in the web design community, we still look toward Opera for innovation. They come up with a lot of these ideas first only to be duplicated by competitors and ultimately improved upon.

Seriously, how long had Opera displayed ‘speed dial’ as a home screen before Apple came along and produced their own version. Obviously Apple made this sexier with a curved effect and reflections but Opera were there first.

Has Facebook Places failed already?

Location based social networking is surely the breakthrough of 2010 with the likes of Foursquare and Gowalla competing for most of the previous year. Facebook Places arrived late onto the scene and, as a result, has not run entirely to plan.

First we had the statement on launch night from Mark Zuckerberg himself that the usefulness of ‘checking in’ at locations via Facebook would allow users to find their friends in the real world.

Come on, we all know the real reason is:

Google TV falters

The battle between Google TV and Apple TV took another turn this week and there are still no clear victors.

I recently opted for Apple TV because I wanted the original version but wasn’t prepared to pay the price. The re-release and price reduction to £99.99 may prove beneficial in the war as it snapped up early buyers.

Although not instantly blown away by Apple TV, I recognise the potential in what’s to come. Initially, the UK version does not give you access to TV programmes, just films and your own iTunes library. But, that will come in time in addition to apps or extensions similar to that on the iPhone.